Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 8/19/19

By | Contests | No Comments

Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


AUGUST 20 — FILMMATIC TV PILOT AWARDS — Late Deadline — $30+


AUGUST 26 — LAUNCH PAD FEATURE COMPETITION — Final Deadline — $95


AUGUST 31 SCREENCRAFT DRAMA SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Final Deadline — $69


AUGUST 31 — SCRIPT PIPELINE SCREENWRITING COMPETITION — Special Entry Deadline — $25


AUGUST 31 — SHORE SCRIPTS FEATURE CONTEST — Late Deadline — $60


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Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 8/12/19

By | Contests | No Comments

Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


AUGUST 13 — FRESH VOICES — Early Deadline — $60


AUGUST 15 — WESCREENPLAY TV PILOT CONTEST — Final Deadline — $69


AUGUST 15 BOOK PIPELINE: FICTION CONTEST — Early Deadline — $55


AUGUST 15 — RICHMOND INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Late Deadline — $65


AUGUST 20 — LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL SCREENPLAY AWARDS — Late Deadline — $51+


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Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 8/5/19

By | Contests

Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


AUGUST 5 SET IN PHILADELPHIA — Final Deadline — $77


AUGUST 5 — LAUNCH PAD FEATURE COMPETITION — Late Deadline — $85


AUGUST 11 — ROADMAP WRITERS: JUMPSTART — Late Deadline — $68


AUGUST 13 — FRESH VOICES — Early Deadline — $60


AUGUST 15 — WESCREENPLAY TV PILOT CONTEST — Final Deadline — $69


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Announcing Coverfly Pitch Week

By | About Coverfly, Announcements

We’re very excited to announce Coverfly Pitch Week.

Pitch Week is a free-for-writers initiative that pairs talented emerging writers with industry professionals for virtual general meetings. These virtual meetings allow writers to pitch themselves and their projects to industry pros (agents, managers, and producers).

Coverfly Pitch Week is unique in two simple ways:

  1. Coverfly Pitch Week is free.
  2. Coverfly Pitch Week is merit-based. Writers opt-in to having their profile reviewed on Coverfly, and we select the top writers for Pitch Week.

Managers and agents who choose to hear pitches from top Coverfly writers understand that the writers they’ll be hearing from are talented and uniquely ready to have their work optioned or sign with a literary agent and/or manager.

We already quietly launched our first Pitch Week this past spring, and it was a big success. We set up 160 virtual meetings between about 50 writers selected from The Red List and 20 representatives from companies such as CAA, Good Fear, Circle of Confusion, Zero Gravity, Lee Stobby Entertainment, Cartel Entertainment, and Management 360, among several others. We helped multiple writers sign with reps as a direct result of the event.

Now, we’re opening it up to all Coverfly members to apply to have their profile and work reviewed. We’ll be running this event 2-3 times per year – so be sure to apply every few months. Are you interested in practicing your pitch and meeting industry professionals who are looking for talented emerging writers? Apply for free now!


See what writers are saying about Coverfly Pitch Week:

“Coverfly’s Pitch Week was a great icebreaker to gain access to the people who make things happen- it’s a good opportunity to be read and considered, everything else is up to the quality of writing.”

Brock Newell

“Coverfly is unique. They actually care. They care about their writers and want to do what they can to facilitate their success. So grateful to have a platform to be “heard.””

Beth Curry

“The chance to chat briefly with legit lit managers for free seemed too good to be true. But it was just as promised. A great opportunity for screenwriters trying to break in.”

Clint Williams

“The Coverfly Pitch Week is a great way to connect with reps from the comfort of your own living room, and given that you’ve only got 12 minutes, having that comfort zone helps make the most out of your limited time.”

Ned Farr

“I love Coverfly! Submitting my work to various contests and placing or winning them is great, but driving up that Coverfly score is almost more gratifying. A great score draws attention and, in this industry, that is what we are all looking for.”

Karl Archer

“Coverfly has been an absolutely incredible experience for me from top to bottom! Not only has it provided me valuable exposure and reads through the Red List, it’s also afforded me some invaluable opportunities to connect and meet with some amazing executives! Not to mention the fantastic staff at Coverfly who have been nothing but caring, wonderful and unwavering in their support! Oh yeah, and did I mention it’s all FREE? I am so grateful to have Coverfly in my corner!”

Aarthi Ramanathan

“Coverfly keeps expanding their free services, helping to connect writers with managers, agents and producers in search of powerful material to represent and produce. It’s a fantastic matchmaking service that benefits both sides of the industry.”

Cari Daly

“Coverfly is responsive, attentive, and really cares about their writers. I feel like they take an active interest in me and my career.”

Robin Fusco

“Coverfly is a fantastic service! It’s obvious that the Coverfly team have a sincere passion for helping new talent breakthrough!”

Mukilan Thangamani

“Coverfly has been great as a site where I can show that I’m a writer that’s less of a risk to take a chance with, and won’t waste anyone’s valuable time.”

Erik Sternberger


“Kudos to Coverfly! This organization is extremely classy. I felt like they had my back every step of the way. “

Heather Ragsdale

“Coverfly is great for streamlining the process of submitting my scripts, but for them to proactively set up ACTUAL manager meetings through ‘Pitch Week’ was a totally unexpected benefit that takes the service to another level. Looking forward to seeing this continue to grow as a resource and opportunity for writers.”

Gareth Smith

“Coverfly raised the profile of my scripts for the past year. Now Coverfly Pitch Week has given me an extraordinary opportunity to introduce myself and my work to some top reps in a relaxed setting. Thanks much, Coverfly!”

John Dummer

“After only a year of entering contests, I am certain much of the success I’ve received was directly related to Coverfly. My script is not the norm, so their support has helped it move up the ladder at a significantly faster pace. They actively promoted me as a writer and have set up meetings with top representation. They have also invested their time and energy coming up with ways to support me as a filmmaker. If you get taken under their wing, Coverfly offers a writer, free of charge, more than you could ever ask for.”

Nicole Jones

“Coverfly Pitch Week was an unexpected surprise…just having the chance to connect with managers was really fantastic. I appreciate Coverfly doing all they can to help writers.”

Ervin Anderson

“This was a great opportunity to pitch to managers and make introductions that typically aren’t open to writers. Thank you for making the connection.”

Rich Orstad

“Coverfly is a refreshingly democratic and merit-based ranking system that encourages writers to improve and to branch out while giving them an effective platform to be seen by decision makers. Can’t wait for the next Pitch Week!”

Carlo and Erin Carere

How to Win a Screenwriting Competition

By | Contests, Screenwriting 101

How do you win screenplay competitions? Well, unfortunately, there is no magic formula. (Sorry to burst your bubble!) However, throughout my years of contest reading, I’ve noticed some crucial things writers can do to increase the chances of their scripts scoring well and advancing, and yes, possibly even winning!

Before we jump in, it’s important to understand how scripts are generally scored in competitions. Many competitions use a numeric rating system for various categories, which may include plot, character, writing style, theme, narration, spelling/grammar, presentation, marketability, etc. Readers assign point values for each category, and the scripts that score above a certain number advance to the next round. Generally, the contest judges read the highest-scoring scripts and then choose finalists and winners.

Now that we’re up to speed, let’s dive into how you can increase your score and your likelihood of winning.

Submit to the Right Competitions for Your Script

Not all screenplay competitions are created equal. Some are more high profile than others. Some focus on finding underrepresented voices and stories, while others are looking for the next commercial blockbuster. Some focus on specific genres, such as horror, action, or comedy. Some are only looking for spiritual, religious, or uplifting content. Each competition is looking for something different.

An important first step in winning a competition is to determine what contests are looking for your type of material. There’s no point in entering your high-concept horror script into a contest looking for heartwarming, spiritual stories. That’s why it’s so important to do your research: so you don’t waste time or money submitting to contests that aren’t the right fit for your script.

It’s also helpful to find out what each contest’s judging criteria are before submitting. Some competitions, such as The Academy Nicholl Fellowships, actually lay out their criteria in advance for writers to review. If you can find out what categories a contest uses for judging, it can be a window into understanding that contest’s tastes and what needs to be done to advance in the competition.

Do a Pass for Each Judging Category

If you can get ahold of the judging categories for the contests you’re entering, be sure to do a revision pass specifically for each category. This is a fantastic way to make sure your script is the best it can be in terms of plot, structure, character, theme, writing style, presentation, etc. If you can’t get ahold of the contest’s specific criteria, doing a pass for the general categories listed above will still elevate your script and increase its chances of success.

Ask yourself with each pass: is the plot tight and well-paced? Does the structure of the script make sense and allow the character(s) to go on a journey? Are the characters three-dimensional and dynamic? Do I have a thematic thread that ties the story together, and is my messaging on point? Are my lead characters going on a journey that has meaning and depth? Is my writing style concise and engaging? Are my fonts, margins, tabs, etc. set at industry standard? (Using screenwriting software will usually take care of that for you.)

Follow the Competition’s Rules and Guidelines

For several years, I’ve read for a writing contest that is quite strict about writers following its page count and subject matter guidelines. If the submitted material doesn’t comply, unfortunately, it’s disqualified. Some contests, like that one, have strict guidelines, whereas others are more forgiving when it comes to things like page length. The thing is, you won’t know which contests are strict and which aren’t going in. The safest thing you can do to make sure your script doesn’t get disqualified from the go is to stick to the recommended page lengths and any other specific guidelines, such as margins, font, etc.

Proofread Your Script (or Better Yet, Have Someone Else Proofread It)

The presentation of the script is the only thing a writer has 100% control over. You can’t control your contest readers and whether or not they connect to your story. You can’t control the scores a reader gives, or if you get advanced to the next round. But you can and should control how polished your script looks when you submit it.

If a writer submits a sloppy script, it reflects poorly on that writer and poorly on presentation and spelling/grammar scores. Why risk not being advanced to the next round because you didn’t proofread? The best thing you can do is to have a trusted friend, relative, fellow writer, or proofreading service look over your script for you. It’s challenging to catch your own errors when you’re so used to seeing your own words on the page. If you don’t have anyone who can help, then reading your script out loud yourself is very helpful for catching errors. When you read it out loud, you say every word and you’ll hear right away if grammar or syntax is off. If you are using Final Draft, the program can read your script aloud as well, via the Assign Voices and Speech Control functions.

Enter Competitions That Offer Feedback

Some competitions offer included feedback as part of the entry fee, or optional feedback that you can add on when you submit. Getting feedback from your readers can be incredibly helpful in understanding how your script is perceived, and what revisions you can make to improve it for the future.

Vet Your Script, and Submit the Best Possible Version

Writing can be a lonely pursuit, and it can be hard to be the only judge of the quality of your material. So why not join a writers’ group? Not only is it a great way to make friends who share your same interests, but you can also get several honest opinions on multiple drafts of your work before you submit it to competitions.

Note that I said “multiple drafts” just then! It’s never a good idea to submit a first draft or a script that isn’t ready just because of a contest deadline. While deadlines are great motivators, throwing something together just to be able to enter is a waste of time and money. Make sure your script is thoroughly vetted by writer friends, a writers’ group, or through professional feedback (like a reputable coverage service, or professional writing consultant) before entering contests.

Submit to Multiple (Reputable) Competitions

Do your research on what competitions will help advance your career. You want to choose ones that have reputable production companies, producers, agents, and execs who will be either judging the scripts or reading the winners. Don’t shotgun your script to every contest, but don’t be afraid to enter a solid handful of contests that are a good fit for your script. What doesn’t advance in one competition can win another—you never know.

The Coverfly team thoroughly vets the competitions allowed on the platform, and it is constantly growing. See the contests available on Coverfly here.


While winning a screenplay competition isn’t ultimately in your control, making sure you submit to the right contests and get your script in the best shape possible certainly is. Best of luck with your contest submissions!


Rebecca Norris is an award-winning writer and independent producer. Her feature film, Cloudy With a Chance of Sunshine, is distributed on Prime Video and DVD, and two of her short films are distributed through Shorts International. Before becoming a full-time writer, Rebecca worked in development and read for numerous production companies and screenplay competitions. She is currently working on a novel while chasing her adorable, yet fast-moving toddler. Follow Rebecca on Twitter at @beckaroohoo.


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Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 7/29/19

By | Contests

Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


JULY 31 SCREENCRAFT SHORT SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Final Deadline — $49


JULY 31 — SHORE SCRIPTS TV PILOT CONTEST — Regular Deadline — $45+


JULY 31 — VAIL FILM FESTIVAL SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Early Deadline — $38


JULY 31 — PITCH NOW SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Early Bird Deadline — $40


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Are Screenwriting Classes Worth It?

By | Screenwriting 101

Fade in. 

INT. CONFERENCE ROOM OR CLASSROOM — DAY

Your typical meeting space. There’s a whiteboard that hasn’t been fully cleaned, a long conference table, and a chatty GROUP of writers gathered around. They talk about their current screenwriting projects… 

Until a bubbly TEACHER enters the room, a PILE OF SCRIPTS in hand.

TEACHER
Alright everyone, let’s get to work.

***

Okay, I admit, screenwriting classes probably don’t look like this. Nowadays many happen virtually, so your fellow classmates could be pajama-clad or at the bar down the street and you’d never be the wiser.

Classes don’t come cheap though, and you’re likely wondering if they’re worth all the money. Unfortunately, the answer is one of those standard non-answers: it depends. 

It depends… on what you’re hoping to get out of the classes.

If you’re a newbie, just looking to learn the structure and form of screenwriting, don’t waste your money. The basics of screenwriting can be found in any number of books, blog posts, and online resources, such as The Script Lab, ScreenCraft and WeScreenplay. 

But if you’re struggling with writing in some way, consider taking a class or two.

Writing is a solitary act. Unless you have a writing partner, more often than not, you’re alone with your computer and a cup of coffee, just trying to get the words out. It’s a process that doesn’t include a lot of feedback. 

Screenwriting classes can be extremely beneficial for the part of the writing process that requires feedback.

Sure, you could do revisions and edits on your own. But what if Suzy who sits next to you on Saturdays has an idea that could blow your plot wide open? What if Joe who doesn’t speak up in class but gives thoughtful, detailed notes via email makes you realize that your character is completely wrong? 

Any screenwriting class worth its salt will offer some kind of feedback — whether that’s peer feedback or instructor feedback or both. That kind of group mind is invaluable to screenwriters. It’s difficult to view your own writing through completely clear glasses, but your classmates can. 

Screenwriting classes are helpful in teaching screenwriters a process for developing, outlining, writing, and revising their projects. 

Whether it’s dictated by a specific instructor who prefers a certain process to another, or by the organization as a whole, this kind of structure gives writers a route on which to travel once the class is over. It’s a repeatable process that you, as the screenwriter, alone with your laptop and coffee and snoozing cat in the corner, can implement time and time again. That’s what we call return on investment. 

But maybe the best thing about screenwriting classes is that they include deadlines. 

Most of us aren’t lucky enough to write screenplays for a living — we have day-jobs, children, spouses, side-gigs, and dinner to cook. But when you take the initiative to sign up and pay money for a screenwriting class and that class includes deadlines, you’re more likely to do the work.

Write your screenplay in five weeks with the guide from The Script Lab.

These kinds of deadlines are essential because it means that someone else is waiting for your work. It introduces an element of accountability that isn’t present when it’s just you, the laptop, the coffee, the cat, and the sound of someone in the other room doing anything that sounds more fun than writing. Accountability is key. 

There are oodles of other benefits to screenwriting classes —

A network of students and instructors, exposure to other writing, the chance to improve your own feedback skills, etc. In my opinion, having taken several screenwriting classes, they’re more than worth it. 

Ultimately, the bottom line is: What do you want to get out of it?

If the class can provide whatever you’re looking for, click that sign-up button now.


Full disclosure: The Script Lab, ScreenCraft and WeScreenplay are partner sites of Coverfly.


Britton Perelman is a writer and storyteller based in Los Angeles, California. When not buried in a book or failing spectacularly at cooking herself a meal, she’s probably talking someone’s ear off about the last thing she watched. She loves vintage typewriters, the Cincinnati Reds, and her dog, Indy. 


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Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 7/22/19

By | Contests

Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


JULY 22 — SLAMDANCE SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Late Deadline — $75


JULY 23 — FINAL DRAFT’S BIG BREAK — Last Chance Deadline — $75


JULY 26 — SERIES FEST’S WOMEN’S WRITING COMPETITION — Final Deadline — $55


JULY 31 SCREENCRAFT SHORT SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Final Deadline — $49


JULY 31 — SHORE SCRIPTS TV PILOT CONTEST — Regular Deadline — $45+


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Calling All Writers! Weekly Screenwriting Contest Roundup — 7/15/19

By | Contests


Screenwriting competitions are tried and true when it comes to planting a foot firmly in the appropriate door. Here are five of the hottest contests that are wrapping up soon. – Some with deadlines this week! Keep up to date with all of 2019’s top competition, fellowship and lab deadlines here.


JULY 15 — WESCREENPLAY SHORTS CONTEST — Final Deadline — $49


JULY 15 — LAUNCH PAD FEATURE COMPETITION— Regular Deadline — $75


JULY 15 WESCREENPLAY TV CONTEST —Regular Deadline — $59


JULY 22 — SLAMDANCE SCREENPLAY COMPETITION — Late Deadline — $75


JULY 31 — SHORE SCRIPTS TV PILOT CONTEST — Regular Deadline — $45+


For all the latest from Coverfly, be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Announcing Free Live Table Reads

By | Announcements

Today we’re thrilled to announce the rollout of our latest writer discovery initiative: free, bi-monthly live table reads of projects atop The Red List.

Coverfly’s core mission is to facilitate the discovery of talented writers. That means helping writers get started, develop their projects, and gain exposure on those projects when they’re ready.

We already offer various free tools that help writers gain exposure on their projects, including free hosting on our Industry Dashboard (where hundreds of industry execs are currently browsing), Coverfly Pitch Week*, free project file sharing, a curated list of screenwriting competitions and fellowships, and The Red List.

Live table reads, on the other hand, bolster the tooling we provide for the bottom end of the project development pipeline – helping writers write. We think this complements the other two programs in this category, our fee waiver program and coverflyX.

The inaugural Coverfly Live Table Read (June 2019)

We are selecting writers with high Coverfly Scores who have a project that could benefit from a live performance. Basically, if there is a project with two characters and hardly any dialogue, it probably wouldn’t benefit from this. As much as THE QUIET PLACE was a great movie, a silent film may not make for an exciting table read. There needs to be something performative about the piece.

We are doing it on the first and third Saturday of each month. The table reads are produced and cast by our partner Shaan Sharma and his team at The Storytellers Conservatory and professional CSA (Casting Society of America) casting directors. The cast are entirely professional union actors. They are held at Culver City Casting Studios, the American Film Institute (AFI), or the Writers Guild Foundation Library.

The events basically serve three purposes: (1) a chance for actors, writers, casting directors, and creators to network, (2) allow the writer to workshop the latest draft of their project by seeing and hearing it aloud, and (3) the fun for the writer of actually seeing their material on their feet for typically siloed writers.

We hope this free program will enrich the work and careers of 24 writers on Coverfly each year. Click here to apply!

Happy writing!

*Coverfly Pitch Week is a week where we set up hundreds of virtual meetings between top Coverfly writers and literary managers and agents. It has been in stealth-mode and hasn’t been formally made public yet. There will be a public announcement about it soon!